Film Screening: Harun Farocki – Museum of Impossible Forms

Turunlinnantie 1, 00900 Helsinki
Stoa

A series of short films by German director Harun Farocki are screened as part of Museum of Impossible Forms collective’s exhibition There will be no landscape after the battle.

A series of short films by German director Harun Farocki are screened as part of Museum of Impossible Forms collective’s exhibition There will be no landscape after the battle.

Films shown in the screening:
Inextinguishable Fire (1969), 25 min
Before Your Eyes – Vietnam (1982), 114 min
Eye / Machine (2000), 23 min
War at a Distance (2003) 58 min
Serious Games I-IV (2010) 44 min

Harun Farocki (1944 - 2014) was born in Novy Jicin (Czech Republic, annexed to Germany at the time). Farocki wrote essays, film and television scripts. His work was exhibited at Documenta 12 in Kassel and in many international retrospectives.
Farocki began making films in the late 1960s amid a highly politicised cultural milieu. Citing the influence of such Marxist cultural practitioners as theatre director Bertolt Brecht, philosopher Theodor Adorno, and film director Jean-Luc Godard, Farocki consistently addressed two principal subjects: the practices of labour and the production of images. Farocki is particularly known for his explicitly political essay films, through which he examined these subjects while also openly confronting the inherently persuasive, manipulative properties of the cinematic medium.

Many of his direct-cinema works unobtrusively observe media productions, training sessions, and product demonstrations. In his later works, Farocki explored what he termed “operative images”—technical images created for military and surveillance purposes that were not necessarily intended for public consumption. Farocki prompts viewers to think about the powerful role of visual media in shaping our understanding of ourselves and others, as well as about the social and political systems that send images into the world.

Farocki dedicated an extense part of his work to analyse war and the ideology encrypted into the images it produces. For this exhibition, we dedicate a one-day screening to engage, learn and reflect through a selection of works spanning from 1969 to 2010.

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