Film Screening: Oleksiy Radynski – Museum of Impossible Forms

Turunlinnantie 1, 00900 Helsinki
Stoa

A series of short films by Ukrainian director Oleksiy Radynski are screened as part of Museum of Impossible Forms collective's exhibition There will be no landscape after the battle.

A series of short films by Ukrainian director Oleksiy Radynski are screened as part of Museum of Impossible Forms collective's exhibition There will be no landscape after the battle.

Films shown in the screening:
Incident in the Museum (2013), 8 min
People Who Came to Power (2015), 17 min
Landslide (2016), 28 min
The Film of Kyif, Episode One (2017), 8 min
Circulation (2020), 11 min

Oleksiy Radynski is a filmmaker and writer based in Kyiv. His films have been screened at International Film Festival Rotterdam, Kurzfilmtage Oberhausen, Docudays IFF, the Institute of Contemporary Arts (London), and S A V V Y Contemporary (Berlin), among others, and have received a number of festival awards.

After graduating from Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, he studied at the Home Workspace Program (Ashkal Alwan, Beirut). In 2008, he cofounded Visual Culture Research Center, an initiative for art, knowledge, and politics in Kyiv.

His texts have been published in Proxy Politics: Power and Subversion in a Networked Age (Archive Books, 2017), Art and Theory of Post-1989 Central and East Europe: A Critical Anthology (MoMA, 2018), Being Together Precedes Being (Archive Books, 2019), and e-flux journal.

Landslide, 2016
Director: Oleksiy Radynski | DOP: Max Savchenko, Sasha Bojko | Sound: Oleksandr Gorbunov | Editing: Mykola Bazarkin and Oleksiy Radynski | Line Producer: Lyuba Knorozok | Production: Svitlana Zinovyeva

Landslide is a film that represents post-revolutionary Ukraine through a community of people who ‘try to build a new society’ in the cracks and pores of a collapsing social system.

The film unfolds in central Kyiv, in a space that has been reclaimed from the city by forces of nature. As a result of a series of landslides, the area of Petrivska street has become untenable and was subsequently occupied by the outcasts and outsiders of all kinds. It also became an important meeting spot for counterculture and artistic underground. A secretive graffiti team, a group of tech geeks and an avant-garde gay theatre that fled the war in Luhansk all struggle to create a place where they could coexist outside the pressure of dysfunctional social structures.

Schließen